A Vacation With A Little Family Genealogy Or Here Are Some Pictures Of My Vacation

Have you ever watched the television show Who Do You Think You Are, and felt a little envious when they fly off to some distant part of the world? I know I have often said to myself, “if only I could do that.” Well, in a small way I did just that. My wife and I took a vacation trip to Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada, I am well aware that it is not the same as Rome, Italy or London, England but it will have to do. Digby is the place my loyalist 4th great grandparents went to when the American Revolution didn’t end as they had hoped.

On the way, we drove through Maine. Maine is a state that I will have to return to as it holds much family history. We stopped in Brunswick, Maine and visited the home of Joshua Chamberlin commander of the famed Civil War 20th Maine Regiment. I had a 2nd great uncle that served in the 20th Maine.

This is Chamberlin's house. His church, family grave site and Bowdon College where he worked were all in a few blocks of this house. In fact the church and college were just across the street.

This is Chamberlin’s house. His church, family grave site and Bowdon College where he worked were all in a few blocks of this house. In fact the church and college were just across the street.

On the backside of Joshua Chamberlin's wife grave stone he had the word unveiled put on. His wife was blind the last few years of her marriage and this was a reference that now she could see.

On the backside of Joshua Chamberlin’s wife grave stone he had the word unveiled put on. His wife was blind the last few years of their marriage and this was a reference that now she could see.

In all the Who Do You Think You Are episodes they have an expert show the person around when they arrive in that exotic far away place. I was no different. Daryl, a cousin more that filled that role for us.

I am on the left and our host Daryl on the right. I could not have asked for a better host. I learned so much in my short time there.

I am on the left and our host Daryl on the right. I could not have asked for a better host. I learned so much in my short time there.

Going to where your ancestors lived is the best way to learn about how they lived and get the feel of the land. The local history comes alive. I was also able to get three books that I may never have known about, they have given me not only an insight on how they lived, but facts about them I would never have known.

This is Fort Ann. I was to learn much history on my visit.

This is Fort Ann. I was to learn much history on my visit.

The tides are the highest in the world. They rise up over 50 feet. The light house would be right behind the picture taker to warn ships away.

The tides are the highest in the world. They rise up over 50 feet. The light house would be right behind the picture taker to warn ships away.

My wife on the left with the people who are restoring a old family farm house and church. This is at the bottom of a large hill from the Loyalist Burying Ground. They were great people who served us cold drinks and even let me ring the restored church bell. This was a much used church of my ancestors dating back to before 1850. Sadly it is no longer used.

My wife on the left with the people who are restoring a old family farm house and church. This is at the bottom of a large hill from the Loyalist Burying Ground. They were great people who served us cold drinks and even let me ring the restored church bell. This was a much used church of my ancestors dating back to before 1850. Sadly it is no longer used.

The Loyalist Burying Ground. This place is off the beaten path, but well worth the effort. This small grave yard is on top of a hill that in order to get to you have to walk through fields. The dirt road gives way to a path then fields. But yet it is well maintained. They take pride in their history.

The Loyalist Burying Ground. This place is off the beaten path, but well worth the effort. This small grave yard is on top of a hill that in order to get to you have to walk through fields. The dirt road gives way to a path then fields. But yet it is well maintained. They take pride in their history.

Most of these people are related to me. This is in the Loyalist Burying Ground.

Most of these people are related to me. This is in the Loyalist Burying Ground.

This marker is placed near the spot the Loyalist landed to make a new start for themselves. I had a 4th great grandparents and a 3rd great grandfather in that landing.

This marker is placed near the spot the Loyalist landed to make a new start for themselves. I had a 4th great grandparents and a 3rd great grandfather in that landing.

Here I am in the genealogy room of the Admiral Digby Museum Genealogy Room. So much information and so little time. This is a great place with very helpful people.

Here I am in the genealogy room of the Admiral Digby Museum Genealogy Room. So much information and so little time. This is a great place with very helpful people.

On the way home, we stopped in Haverhill Ma. to visit the statue of Hannah Dustin. Hannah is my wife’s first cousin ten times removed. The short story of Hannah is that she had just given birth when Haverhill suffered an Indian raid. Her husband was able to save all the children except the new-born baby. Hannah was taken captive. A few days into her captivity she was able to kill all the Indians in her party while they slept with an axe. She was then able to make her escape. My wife’s family in that same time period had a 7th great grandfather killed by a tomahawk to the head and his son my wife’s 6th great uncle captured and tortured.

The Hannah Dustin statue. I do not think we will ever be able to understand the hardships our ancestors had to endure.

The Hannah Dustin statue. I do not think we will ever be able to understand the hardships our ancestors had to endure.

This is a side plaque showing Hannah's husband protecting the children

This is a side plaque showing Hannah’s husband protecting the children

It was not all genealogy. My wife managed to find no less than five quilt shops to visit and even a quilt show. We also spent a day at Old Orchard Beach in Maine. So this is my report of how I spent my summer vacation.

Some of the many great quilts at the quilt show in Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada. For a very small town they have many active quilters.

Some of the many great quilts at the quilt show in Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada. For a very small town they have many active quilters.

Old Orchard Beach in Maine. This was a real fun day.

Old Orchard Beach in Maine. This was a real fun day.

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34 Responses to A Vacation With A Little Family Genealogy Or Here Are Some Pictures Of My Vacation

  1. mandorac says:

    What a wonderful trip! And yes, I’ve often said to myself, “I wish I could go there!” to do more research. πŸ™‚ I’m glad you were able to visit the home of your ancestors, and the church visit…oh my goodness! The pictures were great. I learned a bit about the Loyalists by watching the McAdams sisters WDYTYA. πŸ™‚ The story about Hannah was captivating; I agree with you, I just don’t think we can ever understand the hardships our ancestors had to endure to survive. Thanks for sharing!

    • chmjr2 says:

      Thank you for reading my blog. I have learned that Canada takes great pride in their loyalist. If not for my 3rd great grandfather moving to Maine I might have been born in Nova Scotia, Canada. I find it fascinating how things turn out in genealogy.

  2. I enjoyed reading your post and looking at your pictures. I have only recently started finding relatives in New England. Hannah Dustin is my 4th cousin, 8 times removed, so I’m related to your wife, distantly! My father’s family has been in America since before the war, but it looks like all of them fought for the other side, then moved south. I’m looking forward to more news about your family, especially now that I know we are related.

    • chmjr2 says:

      I guess I should say hello cousin in law. However we may be related also. A few years back I found that my wife and I are 10th cousins. A very small gene pool back in the 1600s. I look forward to your future comments on my blog. Thanks you for taking the time.

  3. Sandi McGinnis says:

    Just brings back so many memories of our visit to Digby! Wonderful place. Even tho my Dakin was not a Loyalist & got land in OH, this is part of my family history, too. The trip out to the cemetery was very special. Thanks so much for sharing!

  4. Barbara Neal says:

    You had a very busy summer, and yes, I’m green with envy. Nova Scotia, Maine, and Haverhill – I, too have ancestors from all these places, including Hannah Dustin. She is my 7 times great grandmother. So now, not only are you and I distant Noyes cousins, but I am related to your wife as well. Hi, Cuz! Great post, and thanks for all the terrific pics.

    • chmjr2 says:

      Someday we will have to share our family tree. I am lucky that I live in N.Y. and can travel to the New England States where much of my and my wife’s family history took place. Nova Scotia was most likely a once in a life time treat for me. Thank you for your comments.

  5. gpcox says:

    It must be so wonderful to walk to grounds your ancestors walked. That’s something so many of us wish we could do.

    • chmjr2 says:

      It was a great feeling to be able to make that trip. I am not able to express the great feeling I got by sitting in the churches they worshiped in, walking on their old farms, seeing where they are buried, and seeing their names on memorial plaques. The visit was very special to me.

  6. menomama3 says:

    Holy Hannah – what feisty genes in your family tree. Isn’t Old Orchard Beach a riot? And to think just a few clicks down the highway is Kennebunkport, a haven of quiet (though expensive) civility. What an interesting and satisfying vacation you had.

    • chmjr2 says:

      Old Orchard Beach is a riot alright. My wife and I had a great time there. I really liked Maine and we plan to return in the future. I have much family history to chase in Maine all the way to Houlton. Someone from Maine told me that Houlton is not the end of the world but you could see it from there. πŸ™‚

  7. Jimmy M. Sisson says:

    Charles: As always with your blog, it is a great read. I am green with envy, that I too can’t walk in Digby in our DAKIN ancestors footsteps. Nice to see you using the Magic Wand. I also have one.

  8. lifelegaciesproject says:

    Wow, I couldn’t believe the story of your relative, Hannah, with the axe! Sounds like a fun trip!

  9. A great story well told. So glad you recorded and shared it!

  10. Amy says:

    What a wonderful experience! I hope to do something similar in the Philadelphia area and in DC, but the big trip will take me to Poland and then others will be Romania, London, Germany, etc. I just hope to get to all of them eventually.

    You are lucky that your wife supports your interest—-I am also blessed to have a spouse who, although not himself interested, is happy to travel with me to cemeteries and strange cities!

    • chmjr2 says:

      Wow, you have some great trips ahead of you. As for me Nova Scotia will be my big adventure. I have a great wife that supports me in all ways in my family research. Besides it was not all dead ancestors. Quilts shops and beaches, shopping and nice restaurants were all part of the trip. So it seem we are both blessed with great spouses.

  11. edesorban says:

    Great story! What a wonderful geneajourney!
    Thanks for stopping by my blog (http://edesorbanfamily.wordpress.com/)
    Following you now to see where you go next.

    • chmjr2 says:

      I tend to go all over in my blog. I like having fun with my hobby called genealogy. Thanks for following me and I hope you like my future blogs.

  12. What a wonderful trip! I’m very happy for you and your wife—sounds like it was a hugely rewarding experience.

  13. Marie Lough says:

    Wonderful story – thank you for sharing! Living in Florida, I recently found that a good friend of mine is a 9th cousin. We both could trace our family back to the Brackett line in Maine. As you say, we cannot imagine what our ancestors endured. Indians wiped out one whole branch of our family back then.

    • chmjr2 says:

      We just have no idea of what life was like even a hundred years ago, much less 200 or more years Perhaps you and your cousin could put together a book on your common family line. Thanks for reading my blog and taking the time to comment.

  14. Barbara D says:

    Glad you made it to my hometown, Brunswick, Maine. Hope you make it back this way again.

    • chmjr2 says:

      What a nice place to live. I wish I could have had more time in Brunswick. I plan over the next few years to vacation and do research in Maine. So yes I will be that way again. I have ancestors all over the state.

  15. roweeee says:

    Hi Thank you so much for visiting my blog and I could really relate to your desire to end up on who do you think you are and also the financial difficulties of exploring further afield. I am desperate to get over to Ireland but have had a few trips to Surry Hills in Sydney where my Irish ancestors settled when they first came to Australia. I agree with what you say about the geography and the importance of actually visiting a place. They lived in a slum called Frog Hollow and you could really understand why when you walked the streets.It was a huge drop off the main road (a hollow) and I could understand how it would turn into a swamp and a very smelly swamp before modern plumbing. You couldn’t appreciate the topography looking the street directory. Do your ancestors come from Ireland? I’ve spotted the name on my travels.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

  16. Love this post! I am so happy that you were able to do your own “Who Do You Think You Are”! The photos and comments are fantastic. Digby is beautiful and fell in love with the church that’s being restored. Restoring a church is a dream of my hubby and I. Great trip!

  17. aznativekay says:

    Family Genealogy can take you places you never expected. Looks as though you had a wonderful trip and found out fun things about your ancestors. I have been doing mine since I was twelve. I think it is a great way to preserve your family history for the younger generations. Good luck finding more info. It seems the more I find, the more intrigued I get. Love your page

  18. Susan Marg says:

    Thanks for liking my post “What’s for Dinner?” Reading, writing, sitting down with the family – that’s what life’s all about.

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