Great Loves Live On.

Willis Deloria with Pauline Bonnett Deloria holding Charles Moore.

Willis Deloria with Pauline Bonnett Deloria holding Charles Moore.

Willis Deloria and Pauline Bonnett Deloria were my grandparents. They were married in 1918 when Pauline was just over the age of 15, and Willis was 35. It was the first and the last marriage for each of them. Willis died in 1954 when I was three years old. Pauline was to live for 21 more years. Their marriage like most was a celebration of good times and the enduring of bad times. They had five children starting in the 1920s and ending in the 1930s. Then came the Great Depression.

From all accounts, they had what we would call a good marriage in which great love was in evidence. They never had much money, and I am sure the Depression was a major factor. Willis found work in a foundry, bakery, and was a general laborer. Sometime in the late 1940s or early 1950s he had to retire due to health reasons. However, newspapers stories show a family that was active and doing well. I have read about parties attended and given and winning a contest for the best doll at the local playground and family outings.

My Mother Veronica Deloria Moore and me, Charles Moore. 1951.

My Mother Veronica Deloria Moore and me, Charles Moore. 1951.

This picture shows me with my Mother at two weeks of age. She was the second child of my grandparent’s five children. Mom also married an older man. My Dad was 16 years older than my mother. Dad died in 1966, and my mother lived to 2007. She missed him everyday

My wife Sandra Lyon Moore and our first born Charles.

My wife Sandra Lyon Moore and our first born Charles.

The picture above shows my wife with our first born, Charles Henry Moore lll, on his first day at home. We will have two more children. Charles was to be held by his grandmother Pauline the day before she was to suffer a fatal stroke.

One of my favorite pictures. My son Charles and his wife Melissa in a happy moment after the birth of their first child.

One of my favorite pictures. My son Charles and his wife Melissa in a happy moment after the birth of their first child.

Here is Charles with our daughter in law and his wife Melissa celebrating just hours after the birth of their son Charles the Fourth. I now have four grandchildren. Charles and Melissa have two sons, and my daughter Pamela has two daughters.

My grandparents gravestone. At the bottom you can read "Great Loves Live On".

My grandparents gravestone. At the bottom you can read “Great Loves Live On”.

When I was younger, I went many times to visit my grandfather’s grave with my grandmother. I would often wonder about the epitaph “Great Loves Live On”. I can recall thinking that it would die when my grandmother died. I only equated the epitaph with my grandmother’s long widowhood. It would be many years before I took in it’s simple yet profound message. We all are a result of love. We owe our existence and so much more to our ancestors. The intimate feelings that formed their unions vibrate through the years. Even if we do not know who they are. Some of the truth of that epitaph is in evidence in the pictures above.

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48 Responses to Great Loves Live On.

  1. boundforoz says:

    What a beautiful story. Quiet but true.

  2. lbeth1950 says:

    Love this story.

  3. heneker52 says:

    a lovely story, and I love the pictures with it

  4. A truly generational story. Yes, great love does live on. 🙂

  5. Thanks for posting – I feel better for reading this.

  6. Jim McKeever says:

    Wonderful post, Charles … The presence of a well-loved newborn in each of the photos proves the epitaph is correct. Enduring love is sacrifice indeed, and it seems the generations before us did more than their fair share.

    • chmjr2 says:

      Thank you once more for reading my blog and your comments. We all stand on the shoulders of those who came before us. It gives me a proud feeling to see the love and sacrifice that came before me so that I could be here.

  7. KerryCan says:

    I love the way you used the photos from the multiple generations to illustrate your theme–great post!

  8. Lorraine says:

    My grandpa was 26 when he married my 15 and 1/2 year old grandma in 1915. It was a small family scandal but grandma wanted her man and she got him!

  9. Lorraine says:

    Grandma and Grandpa went on the have 9 children, all lived but one. Now 80 years after her birth as the final child, mom is gone too. Only one aunt is left alive and she’s 90 years old. Nice story. My daughter’s name is Melissa and she married a Charles (Chuck)! LOL

  10. This is definitely written from the heart. I found it very touching and sincere. We not only inherit DNA from our ancestors. We also embody some of their ideas, attitudes and patterns of behavior.

  11. What a beautiful family story, and what a wonderful epitaph that lives on in your future generations.

  12. Su Leslie says:

    This is a wonderful story of love and family bonds; and a great tribute to your grandparents.

  13. Amy says:

    This is just a beautiful post—every word and every picture is full of love. I wonder how many people thought it odd that she married a man 20 years her senior. Hard to imagine today. But they must have proved any doubters wrong. What a great love story!

    • chmjr2 says:

      From all that I have been able to learn and observe they ha a very good marriage. The age difference as far as I know made little or no difference. My parents also had a large age difference. I wonder if that was done more in that time period?

      • Amy says:

        I don’t know. My in-laws were ten years apart, and I have former colleagues who were seventeen years apart. But you don’t see it very often these days.

  14. mandorac says:

    Lovely story and sentiment. Thank you for sharing. 🙂

  15. Spyro says:

    Thank you for this story – a good thing to remember – “product of love” – you are lucky to have such great pictures from your past – I wonder if grandchildren or children of those who raised families during the Depression really understand how tough those times were –

    • chmjr2 says:

      You are so right that I am lucky to have those pictures. We will never know how hard those times were as I think you have to experience them to fully understand.

  16. I enjoyed traveling through your family tree in pictures. Stories make the pictures come alive. What a great gift for your descendants.

  17. So true. Family matters! Thanks. For visiting my blog.

  18. Stories like this one remind us why we “do” genealogy. Great post!

  19. norcalmom says:

    A man that has interest in his family story! Awesome!

  20. Grandpa Zeke says:

    This touching story illustrates why family research is so meaningful to us all. Great post and photos.

  21. mimiseeks says:

    Thanks for sharing this. Love your blog!

  22. mariaholm says:

    Thank you for sharing this part of your family history. Good that we have the photos and that they can be shared in a new way

  23. Margaret Brennan says:

    Nice story of your grandparents.. Enjoyed reading it,

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