The Glue That Binds

Part of our baseball family. Left to right. Me Charles Moore, Nicole, in back with sunglasses Jessica, my son Charles and his son's Charles and Braden. Yes Charles is a popular name in our family. "I feel an invisible bond between our three generations, an anchor of loyalty linking my sons (children) to the grandfather whose face they never saw but whose person they have already come to know through this most timeless of all sports, the game of baseball." Doris Kearns Goodwin

Part of our baseball family. Left to right. Me Charles Moore, Nicole, in back with sunglasses Jessica, my son Charles and his son’s Charles and Braden. Yes Charles is a popular name in our family.
“I feel an invisible bond between our three generations, an anchor of loyalty linking my sons (children) to the grandfather whose face they never saw but whose person they have already come to know through this most timeless of all sports, the game of baseball.”
Doris Kearns Goodwin

Some things run through families generation after generation. Some of them are not pleasant while some are a much-cherished item. Some families have generations of doctors, writers, or certain noses, chins, or even a certain laugh. While I am aware that family traits are not limited to just one thing, I am going to talk about one trait that seems to be shared in my family line. Perhaps by sharing this family attribute it will give you some ideas in how to tell part of your family story. So what is it that threads its way from generation to generation in my family? It is baseball.

We are very lucky to live near a Triple A  baseball team. The Moore family has enjoyed many games here. "I felt what I almost always feel when I am watching a ballgame: just for those two or three hours, there is really no place I would rather be." Roger Angell

We are very lucky to live near a Triple A baseball team. The Moore family has enjoyed many games here.
“I felt what I almost always feel when I am watching a ballgame: just for those two or three hours, there is really no place I would rather be.”
Roger Angell

My father Charles Moore was the first baseball player I know of in my family. In the 1930s in the midst of the Great Depression, he was able to obtain work due to his skills at playing baseball. He was able to land a job at a lumber mill because he had the ability to play second base for the mill’s baseball team. Many large employers would find work for people who could play ball for the company’s baseball team. These teams played very competitive schedules, and it was not unknown for these players to make it to baseball’s Major League. While playing baseball, they still were expected to put in a days work at the employer’s place of business. I wish I had a picture of my father playing ball, but I do not. The earliest picture I have of him is about 1941 in his army uniform. He was playing for a different team then.

My father's great granddaughter Nicole, flips her bat with style after drawing a walk. "It ain't bragging if you can back it up." Dizzy Dean

My father’s great granddaughter Nicole, flips her bat with style after drawing a walk.
“It ain’t bragging if you can back it up.”
Dizzy Dean

I am the weak link in the talent for playing baseball. While I did play some Little League and much sandlot baseball, I was never able to do much else. What I did do was watch hours of baseball on television some of it with my father. It was here that the start of my education on the strategy of the game began. He would point out what the defense was or should be doing. Different pitching approaches and what the batter should be doing. What skills are needed for each position and what is expected from each player. Then we would laugh when Dizzy Dean would start singing the “Wabash Cannon Ball” during his broadcast. So I also learned that baseball had great humor. It was an education that stayed with me to this very day. I was able to put it to very good use as I started coaching baseball at the age of 16. I coached my first youth baseball team before I could drive. Lucky for me the field was not far away. I would continue to coach for many years at all levels from seven-year-olds to town teams with players up to 18 years of age.

My girl friend Sandy. She was my score keeper for my very first team. Also and perhaps better she married me a few years later. "Love is the most important thing in the world, but baseball is pretty good too." Yogi Berra

My girl friend Sandy. She was my score keeper for my very first team. Also and perhaps better she married me a few years later.
“Love is the most important thing in the world, but baseball is pretty good too.”
Yogi Berra

I was able to coach each of my three children. They had the talent to play the game that I lacked. My oldest son Charles was to play all through high school even being named MVP for his team. My other son Jacob was a dominate pitcher in Little League. He was also one of the best contact hitters I have ever coached. He was not able to play in high school due to his Spina Bifida. However not one to be kept down he made the high school swim team. The youngest was my daughter Pam. She played hardball with the boys in Little League. Her last year playing she had the highest batting average on her team. All three of my children have coached or helped coach their baseball teams and have done a good job

My son Jacob at bat. A near hit. "Since baseball time is measured only in outs, all you have to do is succeed utterly; keep hitting, keep the rally alive, and you have defeated time. You remain forever young." Roger Angel

My son Jacob at bat. A near hit.
“Since baseball time is measured only in outs, all you have to do is succeed utterly; keep hitting, keep the rally alive, and you have defeated time. You remain forever young.”
Roger Angel

My daughter Pam coaching her team. "If your not having fun in baseball, you miss the point of everything." Chris Chambliss

My daughter Pam coaching her team.
“If your not having fun in baseball, you miss the point of everything.”
Chris Chambliss

I have four grandchildren two boys and two girls, and they all have or are playing baseball. They all seem to have a great talent for the game, so I did not curse them. But what I find even better they enjoy the game. It has to be the family’s genes. .

Grandson Braden. "Don't tell me about the world. Not today. It's springtime and they're knocking baseball around fields where the grass is damp and green in the morning and the kids are trying to hit the curve ball." Pete Hamill

Grandson Braden.
“Don’t tell me about the world. Not today. It’s springtime and they’re knocking baseball around fields where the grass is damp and green in the morning and the kids are trying to hit the curve ball.”
Pete Hamill

My son Charles and grandson Charles. The old catcher giving advise to the young catcher.  "Every day is a new opportunity. You can build on yesterday's success or put its failures behind and start over again. That's the way life is, with a new game every day, and that's the way baseball is." Bob Feller

My son Charles and grandson Charles. The old catcher giving advise to the young catcher.
“Every day is a new opportunity. You can build on yesterday’s success or put its failures behind and start over again. That’s the way life is, with a new game every day, and that’s the way baseball is.”
Bob Feller

So what family activity runs through your family? How has it tied the generations together? I am sure that it would be a story worth writing down to be shared with future generations.

Brothers. "The one constant through all the years, Ray has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: It's a part of our past, Ray. It reminds of us all that was good and could be again" From the movie Field of Dreams. 1989

Brothers.
“The one constant through all the years, Ray has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: It’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds of us all that was good and could be again”
From the movie Field of Dreams. 1989

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Lets Talk and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

27 Responses to The Glue That Binds

  1. Amy says:

    I love this post! Love the pictures and the quotes. And most of all your stories. From one baseball fan to another, I say play ball!!

    Oh, and go Sox!!

  2. What a great idea! You never cease to amaze me Charles! What a great focus on a tie that binds! I’m going to share this with my husband whose father loved, loved, loved baseball! Max, my husband played 3rd base, in highschool and for his company he worked for. One of our daughters played, and she and max still love to go to our local AA teams the durham Bulls and the Mudcats! Now they take grandchildren as well! So cool! thanks for the inspiration! Helen

  3. Wonderful story! I love that constant through the generations. 🙂
    On my father’s side, there is an element of engineering that has followed through the generations – from Dad’s father to him and then to one of my sons.
    On my mother’s side, her father and grandfather were great story-tellers. Mum’s brother is a writer and so am I, so that has been a constant in that side of my family.
    Unfortunately, my grandparents’ generation and mine are disconnected through geography, but the connection through interest and ability carries on.

    • chmjr2 says:

      Thanks so much for your comments. The one thing about genealogy is that it shows you the traits as they appear through out the generations.

  4. Mary Tang says:

    Thanks for the article. I know now why I am lousy at sports 🙂 In fact I never understood why people play sports; now I know. They can’t help it! You are not the weakest link, you are the strongest link in telling the story.

  5. Sandi McGinnis says:

    Charles,
    I’m so glad Sandi shares your stories with me. You have “knocked it out of the park” once more!
    Your photos and the accompanying quotes are great. You do a terrific job with your family stories – inspiring us all.
    Bob

  6. Jim McKeever says:

    Great post, Charles! Baseball has been so important to so many of us, generation after generation, as you so wonderfully portray. And you are so fortunate to live near Cooperstown with all its history (and mythology of course). Your post jogged my memory of a family photo I have from 1900 of an ancestor on a Syracuse baseball team. I will have to find it and send you a copy, since genealogy is your other passion.

  7. Not only did I really enjoy your personal story about an interest that unites your family, I have enjoyed thinking and reflecting about our own families and the bonds we share. Thank you for both.

  8. KerryCan says:

    Such an interesting perspective! I need to ponder this idea of a trait that runs consistently through my family . . .

  9. Pingback: 115-year-old photo illustrates family’s link to baseball | Irish Investigations

  10. Angie Mc says:

    I’m glad to connect with you via Jim McKeever and baseball! While I’m not aware of previous family members playing baseball in my family (I have very little information on my ancestors) but I have 3 sons who play and I’m convinced that there is a baseball gene! Seriously, my oldest son (now a college pitcher) started playing “baseball” by himself at a young age when we lived rural remote and he had *never seen the game*! Thanks for the great read and I look forward to reading more from you.

    • chmjr2 says:

      Thank you so much for your comment. I have found other interest and skills that seem to be passed down the generations. My oldest boy also started throwing a ball against a wall (Often the side to our house) at a very young age. Then he would greet me when I got home from work with a glove and a ball for a game of catch.

  11. ccrooksphoto says:

    Good one, Charles. I used to play and follow baseball pretty closely but not so much any more. Still, it remains a grand game.

  12. paulefallon says:

    Love this post! I am heading off toe Williamsport from Corning to visit the Little League Museum. My family were huge baseball buffs and we vacationed in Williamsport to see the Little League championships 50 years ago.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s